What Did The Munich Agreement Allowed Germany To Do

As the threats to Germany and the European war have become increasingly evident, opinions have changed. Chamberlain was awarded for his role as one of the “Men of Munich” in books such as the Guilty Men of 1940. A rare defence of the wartime accord came in 1944 from Viscount Maugham, who had been the Lord`s chancellor. Maugham regarded the decision to establish a Czechoslovakian state with large German and Hungarian minorities as a “dangerous experiment” in the face of previous disputes and described the agreement, which stemmed mainly from the need for France to free itself from its contractual obligations in the face of its vagueness to war. [63] After the war, Churchill`s memoirs of that time, The Gathering Storm (1948), claimed that Chamberlain`s appeasement of Hitler had been wrong in Munich, and noted Churchill`s pre-war warnings about Hitler`s plan of attack and Britain`s folly of disarmament after Germany reached air parity with Britain. While acknowledging that Chamberlain was acting for noble reasons, Churchill argued that Hitler should have resisted in Czechoslovakia and that efforts had to be made to involve the Soviet Union. When the statesmen returned, the full details of the Munich agreement, by which they allowed Germany to conquer the territory of the Sudetenland of Czechoslovakia, were not yet known in a failed attempt to avoid what would become World War II, and it seemed that they had made real concessions to Hitler and at least saved face. The full analysis of the historian Daniel Hucker, whose conclusion is that “the turning point of public opinion in many respects was not the coup d`état in Prague [the German invasion of March 1939], but the Munich agreement itself – shows that public support for Chamberlain after Munich is due to a reflex to decongest and confidence in its policy. The Munich quotation in foreign policy debates is also common in the 21st century.

[107] During negotiations on the Iran nuclear deal by Secretary of State John Kerry, a Republican representative from Texas called the negotiations “worse than Munich.” In a speech in France, Kerry himself referred to Munich for military action in Syria: “This is our munich moment.” [108] One aspect of the huge riots of the past fourteen days must affect anyone who thinks about its history. In the three most powerful countries in Central and Eastern Europe, people had no right to know what was said and done outside. There seems to have been very little news in Russia. In Germany and Italy, the message was deliberately falsified while it was not repressed. The German people were not to know the embassy of President Roosevelt.